Slovakia tops cyber security index

Slovakia tops cyber security index
The National Cyber Security Index (NCSI) measures countries’ preparedness to prevent the realisation of fundamental cyber threats and readiness to manage cyber incidents, crimes and large-scale cyber crises.
By Jaroslav Hroch in Prague April 2, 2018

Slovakia occupies the first rank on the global National Cyber Security Index (NCSI), with 80.52 points, according to the Estonian e-Governance Academy Foundation (EGA) NGO, which drafts the index.

The index measures countries’ preparedness to prevent the realisation of fundamental cyber threats and readiness to manage cyber incidents, crimes and large-scale cyber crises, the EGA says. 

Slovakia joined the index recently together with other seven countries. “Slovakia has put significant efforts into developing their cybersecurity capacities over the past few years. Slovakia achieved the maximum score in an impressive seven of the 12 capacities and takes a slight lead over Germany,” the EGA stated.

The ranking contains 63 countries, all of which Slovakia surpassed in the categories of cyber policies, digital services protection, fundamental services protection, personal data protection, e-identification and confidential services, detecting and responding to cyber incidents 24/7, as well as fighting against cyber-crime, in which the country scored the full amount of points.

Slovakia’s biggest weakness was in military cyber operations.

Among the newcomers, the second best was Sweden, which ended up in 15th place.

On the overall index, Lithuania is in third place after Germany (which was pushed into second place by Slovakia), followed by Spain and the UK. Czechia took sixth place, Poland ninth and Hungary 14th. The difference between Slovakia and Hungary was 18.18 points. 

Southeast European countries tended to perform worse than their CEE peers, with Croatia in 18th place, Romania 22nd, Moldova 28th and Albania 30th. 

The worst of the European countries included on the index was Cyprus, occupying 38th place with 31.17 points.

Among other countries from the wider CEE/CIS region, Ukraine and Belarus were in 16th and 17th place respectively, soundly beating Russia (35th). 

Georgia (in 11th place) was the clear outlier among countries from the Eurasian region, with its neighbours from the Caucasus plus the three Central Asian countries rated all languishing in the 40s and 50s

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