EBRD calls for further reforms in Morocco

By bne IntelliNews November 21, 2013

Reforming the agriculture, infrastructure and energy sectors are Morocco’s key priorities for 2014, the EBRD said in its Transition Report 2013.

The infrastructure sector is suffering from large reform gaps that should be tackled, the EBRD noted. The capacity of municipalities to handle their growing responsibilities for infrastructure and to reform tariffs in order to enhance cost recovery should be increased, according to the bank. These parameters can reportedly be supported by the ongoing efforts towards decentralisation and regionalisation.  

The EBRD also called for additional reform efforts to boost productivity in the value-added agricultural sector. The lack of suitable infrastructure hampers the development of a competitive processing industry, the EBRD noted. Improvements, thus, are needed in the efficiency of input usage, especially water and fertilisers, through tariff and subsidy reform, the EBRD said.

As to the energy-sector reforms, energy subsidies should be cut, state-owned monopolies dismantled and transmission systems revamped, the EBRD said. Such measures will reportedly help introduce a competitive market for electricity.

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