Nearly a third of Turks would prefer to be a citizen of another country, poll finds

Nearly a third of Turks would prefer to be a citizen of another country, poll finds
Despite being a predominantly Muslim nation, only 28% of respondents said they trust other Muslim countries, while 31% said they trust European countries.
By Henry Kirby in London February 19, 2016

Nearly one in three people in Turkey would rather be a citizen of another country, a poll by Boğaziçi University has found.

The study, titled “Basis of Perception of Foreign Policy in Turkey,” was conducted in November last year and asked respondents from across the country a question on a number of national topics.

30% of respondents said they would prefer to be a citizen of another country, while 44% answered that they would not want to.

When asked to name the institutions they have the most trust in, the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) came out top, with 55%. Parliament followed at 43%, with the government coming third with 33%.

Conducted only weeks after last October’s Ankara bombing, which left more than 100 dead, it is little surprise that opinions of the Turkish army were found to be favourable in the poll results, with safety at home clearly no guarantee for Turks.

February 17 saw another bombing occur in the Turkish capital, this time killing at least 28 people.

When asked if Turkey should be active in the fight against terrorism outside of its borders, nearly half of respondents (47%) were against the idea. Only 18% were for it.

Ongoing violence between government troops and the outlawed Kurdistan Worker’s Party (PKK) and the threat of further attacks are clearly leading Turks to believe that the government should be addressing domestic terrorism before allocating resources elsewhere.

Despite being a predominantly Muslim nation, only 28% of respondents said they trust other Muslim countries, while 31% said they trust European countries.

This was reflected by the fact that 37.5% believe that Turkish membership in the European Union would be beneficial for the country, while only 15% thought it would be harmful.

Those polled were also overwhelmingly against the notion of religious leaders playing a role in government. 62% were against the idea, while only 32% were for it.

 

Data

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